The afterlife of Jesse James by Roy Bragg

BLEVINS — On a serene hilltop in this quiet Central Texas farming community, one of the fundamental tenets of American history is under attack.

For decades, Southerners have disagreed on Jesse James’ place in the nation’s collective memory. And now, decades after his death, there’s disagreement on his final resting place.

Read more: http://www.mysanantonio.com/life/article/The-afterlife-of-Jesse-James-3428043.php#ixzz1q49wDqZl

He Saddled up and rode into Eternity

On February 18, 1915 Frank James saddled up and rode into eternity. Tipping my hat to Frank. Below is a link to an old article regarding Frank’s last ride.

http://theoutlaw-jessejames.blogspot.com/

And here’s a little tribute song I think Frank would have liked.

“The Kansas City Star” (Missouri) Sunday, February 21, 1915

Yesterday the relatives and friends of Frank JAMES gathered on
the JAMES farm, near Kearney, Clay County, for the funeral.

A strange funeral! Not a prayer. Not a song. No word from a
minister. Just a short speech from a man who saved him from
the gallows, and was his intimate friend — that, and tears of real
love and affection.

Maybe, after all, those tears coursing down the cheeks of old men
who had fought with him, who had seen his loyalty and friendship
tested in the “dark days,” who knew of his struggles to “beat back”
to good citizenship, held greater promise for his soul than all the
prayers, that might have been said, or hymns sung.

Frank JAMES was one guerrilla beloved and looked up to by all the
others. Those veterans of the days of the “red border” went long
distances to be at his funeral yesterday. One came all the way from
Oklahoma. One got up from a sick bed to go, and as he helped carry
the body of his old comrade, he staggered under the weight.

When Judge John F. PHILIPS, in his funeral speech, standing beside
the coffin, half turned and laid his hand upon it and said:

“Since his surrender he acquitted himself always as a man of high
honor,” a dozen voices, tremulous under the weight of years, answered:
“Amen.”

“From my many conversations with him I learned that he believed in the
divine authenticity of the Bible,” the judge said, “He believed in the divinity
of Jesus and had sublime faith that his sins were forgiven and that he was
the recipient of God’s mercy and that his soul was saved. He told me that
he did not join a church because that act would be misconstrued; the
world would look upon it as some sort of hypocrisy, as being done for show.
He did not believe that it was necessary to join a church. Knowing that he
had been saved by grace, believing that this was a matter between his own
heart and God alone, he did not think that religious services were necessary
at his funeral. He met death serene and unafraid, confident of the future.

The whole countryside went to the funeral. The buggies line the fence for a
long distance each side of the road gate. Not one-fifth of the crowd could get
into the house. And the country roads were thick with black, sticky mud, and
there was promise of rain in the lowering clouds. Those who went by train had
to go three miles from Kearney to the JAMES farm and there they waited for
hours, walking about the farm, standing in groups on the wet sod under the
bare trees, talking of the old times.

There was Morgan MATTOX who was a comrade of Frank JAMES under
Quantrell, the raider. He came all the way from Bartlesville, Ok., to be at the
funeral, and, out under the big coffee bean tree, besides the grave of Jesse
JAMES, he told stories that made the blood tingle, more thrilling than you’ll
find in any story book, and the hero of them all the man lying dead within the
little cottage.

“Ah, he was the fighter for you — never afraid, true always to his comrades, a
fine soldier” said MATTOX.

There was William GREGG, Quantrell’s lieutenant. who received Frank JAMES
into the band when he was a beardless boy, his heart aflame with hate of the
“blue bellied Yankee soldiers.” GREGG is old and feeble now and it was a great
effort for him to go from his home in Kansas City to the funeral.

“The last time I saw Frank JAMES was last spring when I was down with
pneumonia,” said GREGG. “He came out to my house to see me, and, as he
was leaving he came up to me and laid a 10-dollar bill in my hand and said:

“Bill, take it, you need it, I know; and when you want more let me know and it will
come to you.” And the tears rolled down the sunken cheeks of William GREGG
as he told it, and his voice choked.

The pallbearers were:

Ben MORROW of Eastern Jackson County
George SHEPARD of Lees Summit
John WORKMAN of Independence
George WIGGLETON of Independence
William GREGG of Kansas City

all old Quantrell men;

T. T. CRITTENDEN, whose father, while governor of Missouri, received
the surrender of Frank JAMES.

Among those from Kansas City at the funeral were Judge Ralph LATSHAW,
Charles POLK, Lynn S. BANKS, William M. CORBETT, Hal GAYLORD
and “Dusty” RHOADES.

Immediate relatives of Frank JAMES who were present were:
Mrs. Betty PATTON, his aunt
Mrs. J. C. HALL, half-sister
Mrs. William NICHOLSON, half-sister
John SAMUELS, half brother
Jesse JAMES, Jr., nephew *[recent evidence suggests JJ Jr who couldn’t have been considered a “Jr” because his middle name was Edwards and not Woodson; was very likely the son of Wood Hite who was Jesse and Franks cousin]
and his family, and his sister.”
Source: http://forums.delphiforums.com/n/mb/display.asp?webtag=Zeke1&msg=707.7

More info supporting Betty Dorsett Duke’s claim

On June 28, 2010 Dallas Hunt fired a fatal shot into Prof. James Starrs’ 1995 Jesse James DNA results…results highly touted as proving the famous outlaw died just as history reports. Betty Dorsett Duke had mortally wounded them years earlier but they were dying a lingering death. Hunt’s bullet, fired from a 1902 news article, found its mark. Luther James gave a reporter his eye witness account of Clay County, Missouri Sheriff Timberlake opening the casket in the James/Samuel family farmhouse before the burial and, to his horror, saw that the limbs of the purported corpse of Jesse James were missing. According to Timberlake, “The limbs had been taken off at St. Joseph, Missouri.”

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038614/1902-07-13/ed-1/seq-12/;words=James+Jess+Jesses+JAMES+Jessww

Femur bones, the longest and thickest bones of the human skeleton, extending from the pelvis to the knee, were found by Prof. James E. Starrs and his exhumation team in the grave marked as that of Jesse Woodson James in Kearney, Missouri’s Mt. Olivet Cemetery, fully expose the 1995 DNA results as being totally fraudulent, at least in Duke’s opinion it does. See photos of the exhumation, including the femur bones :

http://mredjessegrave.blogspot.com/

Whose grave did Prof. Starrs exhume and whose DNA is he touting as being that of Jesse James?

The Jesse James death mystery continues…

Source: http://jessejamesintexas.com/whatsnew.htm

Fraudulent Jesse James DNA results?

© Betty Dorsett Duke (7/19/2011)

Stephen Caruso, the Deputy Counselor for Clay County during the 1995 exhumation and subsequent DNA testing of Jesse James’ reported grave, recently revealed that the 1995 DNA results touted as proving with a 99.7 degree of certainty that Jesse James died and is buried as history reports are fraudulent. During separate telephone conversations with Texan Betty Dorsett Duke and Missourian Greg Ellison he said that instead of abiding by Clay County Judge Vic Howard’s order for the James Farm & Museum to hand over hair and teeth stored there to Prof. Starrs for DNA testing, he gave him hair he obtained from the head of John Hartman, Director of the Clay County Park’s Department in 1995. The Clay County Parks Department owns and operates the James Farm & Museum, and Caruso represented them (the farm and museum) in their attempt to prevent the hair and teeth from being obtained by Starrs.

Although there are two graves bearing Jesse James’ name in Clay County, Missouri, the original grave a few miles from Kearney in the yard of Jesse James’ boyhood home now turned tourist attraction, and the grave in Kearney’s Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Exhumation Project Leader Professor James E. Starrs originally planned to only exhume the Mt. Olivet grave, but he ended up exhuming the original grave as well. The original grave was exhumed in 1902 for the purpose of reinterring the remains in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, and then reexhumed in 1978 to retrieve remains that were left behind in 1902.

Drs. Stone and Stoneking performed the DNA tests and five years later they, along with Professor Starrs, published their final report regarding their DNA results. They maintain that the hair and teeth used for DNA testing were obtained from the 1978 dig of the original grave, but in 2001 Caruso told NBC 8 KOMU TV Anchorman Jim Riek that the teeth submitted for DNA testing “had nothing to do with the teeth that were dug up.”

Duke relates that the origins of the remains reportedly retrieved during the 1978 dig are highly questionable even if fraud wasn’t involved. She explains that Beth Beckett, the current curator of the James Farm & Museum, told her that Milton “Milt” Perry, the now deceased curator of the James Farm Museum in 1978, performed an unauthorized exhumation of the original grave in Perry encased the human and animal remains retrieved from the grave in a Tupperware bowl and stored it in his desk drawer. Then, as he saw fit, he handed out the remains as souvenirs to various individuals. After being fired for unrelated reasons he augured a hole in the original grave and reburied the Tupperware bowl, along with the remainder of the remains encased in it.

In 1995 the Kearney Courier reported that Starrs obtained a court order to exhume the Tupperware bowl to obtain a tooth that he claimed may “tell the tale”, but later voiced his disappointment that it wasn’t encased in the bowl. Caruso contradicts Starrs’ statement: “We had teeth in the Tupperware bowl. We gave him teeth in the Tupperware.”

Based on the information presented above, one wonders where and who did the teeth used for DNA testing originate from?

Now that the true origin of the hair is known, how can anyone involved in the 1995 exhumation and subsequent DNA results expect the rest of the world to take their word as to the origin of the teeth used for testing?

According to their final report Drs. Stone and Stoneking compared the mtDNA sequence of the hair and teeth submitted to them to the mtDNA sequences of the DNA reference sources (Robert Jackson and Mark Nikkel). Both men claim they are descended from Susan James Parmer (Jesse James’ sister), and therefore share the same mtDNA sequence Jesse James had. A genealogical investigation of their lineage reveals that their validity as mtDNA reference sources is highly questionable.

Duke also inquires how John Hartman’s mtDNA sequence matched Jackson’s and Nikkel’s mtDNA sequences now that Caruso has revealed the mtDNA sequence of the hair had nothing to with them?

Obviously the final DNA report contains conflicting statements. Again, Dr. Stone, Dr. Stoneking, and Professor Starrs state that the mtDNA results do not prove the remains are those of Jesse James yet they also claim “…The DNA results are agreeable with other scientific investigations of the exhumed remains”. Knowing that Caruso claims to have obtained the hair used for DNA testing from Hartman’s head, and also knowing that he said the teeth had nothing to do with the teeth that were dug up, one naturally concludes that none of “the other scientific investigations” are agreeable with the hair and teeth used for DNA testing. Their report also states that there is no scientific basis for doubting the exhumed remains are those of Jesse James.

Only in their dreams, there is every reason to doubt the exhumed remains are those of Jesse James. Professor Starrs used no chain of custody guidelines for the human remains submitted for DNA testing; The hair submitted for DNA testing originated from the head of John Hartman; The teeth submitted for DNA testing are of unknown origin and had nothing to do with the teeth that were dug up; Hartman said, “The results of the 1995 exhumation should be published as they were found, not as they have been framed or sanitized for public consumption;” The validity of the two DNA reference sources’ is highly questionable; and Drs. Stone and Stoneking’s DNA results are highly questionable.

If not for all the tampering with the remains in both of the graves Duke and Ellison would call for them to be exhumed yet again for legitimate DNA testing. However, based on all of the information presented above, neither past nor future DNA results from either of those graves should be trusted.

There is always the possibility that Caruso may have lied about the origin of the hair but why would he, an officer of the court, tarnish his reputation by incriminating not only himself but John Hartman?

Hartman statement about the 1995 DNA results bears repeating because it definitely substantiates Caruso’s claim – “…Framed or sanitized for public consumption”. He was definitely informed of the facts since he was the director of the Clay County Parks Department, the owners and operators of the James Farm & Museum.

Being well aware that the statute of limitations is up on the crime Caruso and Hartman reportedly committed, Duke and Ellison decided that the fraudulent act still needed to be reported to Clay County, Missouri in order for truth to prevail. On July 12, 2011 notarized affidavits were faxed to the Clay County Prosecuting Attorney with the hope that they would investigate the matter and perhaps issue a statement that the 1995 DNA proved nothing.

Jim Roberts handled the situation regarding the affidavits via emails to Duke, but ignored her request to disclose his job title at the Clay County Prosecutor’s office. Right off the bat his statements were very unprofessional and disappointing. According to him Clay County is not going to give any credence to Caruso’s confession of fraud, and they are not going to investigate this very serious matter.

Duke left several telephone messages requesting Prosecuting Attorney Dan White to call her, but as of this date he has failed to do so. Duke asks how the Clay County employees involved in ignoring their own lawyer’s confession of fraud can justify suppressing the truth, ultimately denying Jesse James’ true descendants their birthright for the proverbial bowl of beans (tourist dollars) Jesse James brings to them? She and Ellison are hopeful they will reconsider and take full responsibility for their actions since genealogical and historical accuracy is at stake.

Duke claims the James Farm & Museum is in a perfect position to discredit any new information pertaining to Jesse James’ life and death because the media perceives them as being “the authority on Jesse James”. Having talked with them on a number of occasions she claims what they tell her is much different than what they tell reporters.

In 1999 Duke petitioned Falls County Judge Meyer to grant an order to exhume the grave in Blevins Cemetery bearing James L. Courtney’s name for DNA testing purposes. Although initially disappointed that he denied her request she now realizes that it was for the best. Why? Because even if Jesse James did assume the alias of James L. Courtney and lived and died in Texas, the fraudulent DNA sequence his DNA sequence would have been compared against would have shown that he wasn’t.

Duke believes that Jesse James was born in Clay County, Missouri, but a recently discovered eBay photograph of the James family literally shows what DNA failed to prove – Jesse James got away with his own 1882 murder and lived out the remainder of his life in Texas as James L. Courtney.

James Family / Blevins, Texas
The eBay photograph